Men talking

 

 

People talking

Strategies

Every participant who attends one of our sessions leaves with a Green Sheet filled with tools, tips and techniques, do’s and don’ts, and best practices.

Green Sheet Strategies:

  • can be used immediately
  • are personalized and practical
  • are effective in each individual’s job
  • are tailored for company, culture, and industry
  • help participants target their messages and increase their success.

Green Sheets include strategies like these…

To connect with people who have Millennial values:

  • be positive
  • get to know the individual and refer to personal goals and achievements
  • encourage questions, answer them, check for understanding
  • coach, mentor, inspire.

To connect with people who have X values:

  • be direct and straightforward
  • avoid clichés, hyperbole, buzzwords
  • tie your message to tangible results
  • don’t take challenges personally.

To connect with people who have Boomer values:

  • be personable
  • build the relationship
  • make sure the conversation is two-way, with lots of give and take
  • emphasize vision, mission and values.

To connect with people who have WWII values:

  • be logical and linear
  • refer to history and tradition
  • be more formal and conservative
  • use good grammar, “please” and “thank you.”

To connect with anyone whose values differ, remember:

1. There is always a bridge. No matter how different we are, there is always common ground.

2. Expect the best. Ask yourself, “What are this person’s strengths and assets?” Approach every interaction believing, “This person has valuable contributions to make and important things to say.”

3. Figure out their values. Be curious. Learn about them. Find out what’s important to them, what their goals are, what worries them. If you’re not sure, ask. You will get valuable information, and they will feel valued.

4. Show that you understand. Express empathy. It shows you’re listening and that you respect their core beliefs.

5. Don’t expect reciprocity. No strings attached.

(adapted from The Art of Connecting by Claire Raines and Lara Ewing. American Management Association, 2006)